Daily Roundup: Driver's licenses, immigration reform, property taxes and protest

Gov. Pat Quinn signed a law Sunday that allows undocumented residents of Illinois to obtain driver's licenses. (Rogert Morales, Hoy)

Happy Monday, people.

Here are the stories that caught our attention that you can check out while shaking off the weekend rust:

The biggest news in the state is that Gov. Pat Quinn signed a law that allowed undocumented people to obtain driver’s licenses. By so doing, Illinois became the fourth state in the country to grant this permission, following New Mexico, Utah and Washington state.

Speaking of immigration, the Tribune carried a story about a plan forged by a bipartisan group of senator that would grant legal status to most of the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in the U.S., which could form the basis for a far-reaching overhaul of immigration laws this year.

The plan is likely to generate opposition in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives. Former vice-presidential candidate Paul D. Ryan said on Sunday that President Obama was ignoring the nation’s problems and was choosing instead to focus on the “political conquest” of the Republican Party, according to The New York Times.

Back in the Chicago area, the Civic Federation is publishing a report today that compared property tax burdens across the Chicago region found effective tax rates on the rise in 2010 — based on the latest data available, according to Jon Seidel of the Sun-Times.

Also here in the city, The Sun-Times also reported on the arrest of four people who called on the University of Chicago medical center to open an adult trauma center Sunday to better meet the health-care needs on the South Side. The arrests happened as it prepared to conduct a tour of its new $700 million facility.

Further abroad, the grim news continues to come in from the horrific night club fire in Santa Maria, Brazil.
CNN had a story about Rhode Islanders who can’t help but watch the devastating night club fire in Brazil.

News of death came from the war in Vietnam came for years.  Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and journalist Stanley Karnow chronicled that history ably in books and documentaries. Karnow died on Sunday at age 87.

We are grateful for his contributions are thinking of his family during this difficult time.

We wish the rest of you an enjoyable start to the week.

More tomorrow.


El autor

Jeff Kelly Lowenstein es Editor de Bases de Datos e Investigaciones Vívelohoy

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